Comparison of Massed Versus Distributed Use of Natural Selection Concept Cartoons in a Secondary Biology Curriculum

Comparison of Massed Versus Distributed Use of Natural Selection Concept Cartoons in a Secondary Biology Curriculum
Thesis
Description: 

Evolution, by means of natural selection, is a core concept central to understanding biology. A hurdle to effective natural selection instruction is the wide range of alternative conceptions held by students that help them make sense of the world in which they live; including those regarding evolution. Teachers can use formative assessment tools, such as concept cartoons, to identify student conceptions and facilitate conceptual development and progression to scientific conceptions. This study looks at the timing of concept cartoon practice to evaluate if spacing the interventions over a longer time period resulted in differential learning and/or retention compared to massing the intervention within the evolution unity of study. The results showed that both distributing, as well as massing the intervention, resulted in learning and retention. A control group, who did not receive the images and possible answer choices, did not display significant learning. These results indicate the efficacy and versatility of natural selection concept cartoons as a formative assessment tool for use in a secondary biology classroom.

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WHDL ID: 
WHDL-00006073
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